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Inspired by Hard Work

The students of Jeff High have many inspirational teachers, celebrities and other adults in their life to look up to. This Black History month, Jeff High students talked about the importance of role models, and the people of color who have inspired them.

 Tara Cofie, a former member of student council and debate team, says her mother inspires her most. “She’s a really hard worker, and I respect the things she does for me,” she says. Cofie and her mother were first-generation immigrants to America from Ghana. Her mother encouraged her to do things she liked and that she was good at, “and I guess I thought I was good at arguing with people,” says Cofie. 

Will Loving-Watts, a basketball fan and player, says that Kevin Durant and Kobe Bryant inspire him to work hard. Loving-Watts talks about how the persistence and hard work of Bryant and Durant inspired him to do the same. For example, the day before the state championship, he spent three and a half hours at the gym. “When we won, I felt like they would’ve been proud of me.”

Raquel Lopez is a soccer player, member of Jeff ’s Chefs and yearbook co-editor and she says her parents inspire her most. She wants to be a chef when she’s older and says it’s because of her parents. “My parents poured their hearts into every meal they made and you could always tell who made the food,” Lopez says. “Their food made people happy, and it made me want to do the same for other people.”

 Azarian Bacon, a chess team player, says that Mr. Washington and Mr. Willis inspire him most. “The times they’ve been really proud it is when progress is being made, for me it happened at a rapid pace,” Bacon says. “The first time I played chess I hated it. My eighth grade year I signed up for impacts that didn’t have chess, but I was forced to play it anyway,” he says. Bacon thinks Washington and Willis are proud of him and the improvements he’s made while playing on the chess team. 

The importance of seeing yourself in people around can make all the difference. The inspiration provided by teachers, celebrities and even your own parents can inspire you to pursue anything. As Raquel Lopez says, “For people of color, representation is really important to us. It’s really rare to see ourselves portrayed in TV shows and movies correctly. We often look for people who are similar to us for inspiration, because we desperately want someone to relate to.”

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Safety vs. Reason

On the morning of Thursday, February 5, you hear the sighs of many students as Pam Hall, Jeff High’s interim principal, announces that starting Monday, February 10, backpacks and “large” purses will not be permitted in classrooms.

The rule has always been in effect for backpacks, yet not all teachers enforced it. Now, there has been an addition to the rule: Large purses will not be permitted either.  According to Ms. Hall, a “large purse” is defined as something that can hold a Chromebook or an iPad, but the size of iPad was not specified.

Many students voiced their complaints with the reinforcement of the rule. Some have taken to social media and made public complaints about the rules. According to sophomore Victoria Jade Worrall, “The [enforcement of these] rules on bags make my space more cluttered, and it makes it easier for me to lose assignments or entire folders.” When asked if the rules made her feel safer, she states, “Not really… If someone wanted to commit a crime, they would do whatever they needed to do to go through with it. You could fit a weapon practically anywhere.”

Sophomore Brooklyn Parish says she hears many students complain about the rules. “I hear how a lot of kids fall down the stairs from having their school stuff in their arms.” She goes on to say, “I can see why the school added this rule. It’s to keep us safe. If the school is worrying about someone wanting to hurt people, then they should listen to their students.”

When students are passionate about something, they typically don’t let go of the issue. In the next few days or weeks, students will still be voicing their complaints. All students can do is hope for a change or silence their complaints and deal with it.

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School Start Time: Is 7:45 Too Early For Teenagers?

In early November, as the nights get colder and the days get shorter, the sound of an alarm piercing through the darkness early in the morning can be quite alarming. According to sleepfoundation.org, teenagers need a minimum of 8½ hours of sleep — yet only 15 percent of teenagers get that much. 

Why not just go to bed earlier? According to sleepfoundation.org, teens have a hard time falling asleep anytime before 11 p.m. due to biological sleep patterns.

Sleep is as important as the air you breathe. It is also important for maintaining the stress teenagers face. So why does school begin so early at Jeff High — especially in comparison to other districts, including those where high schools start later than elementary schools? 

According to Greater Clark County Schools superintendent Mark Laughner, “One main reason the district chooses to start high schools before elementary schools is so that older siblings arrive home at the end of the school day prior to their younger siblings. We serve a lot of working parents and this provides them with additional support in the afternoon.” 

Jeffersonville High School sophomore Georgia Martin, who said she wakes up at 5 a.m. to get ready and catch her bus in time, thinks the start time should change. “I hate [the starting time], and I think it should be pushed back an hour,” Martin said. Getting more sleep isn’t the only reason. Martin added that her bus stop is a street over from her house, so she worries about safety walking to her bus stop in the dark. 

In spite of the complaints, the school district does not plan to push back that alarm clock anytime soon. “The district is not looking to change start/end times in the near future,” said Laughner.img_7197

Recent poll results from @thehyphennews on Instagram!!!!

 

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Staff and Student Views on Jeff High Dress Code Changes

This school year, Jeffersonville High School implemented small changes to the student dress code. The most significant change involves shorts and skirts. The new rule is that they should be longer than fingertip length. Previously, they needed to be knee length. The same fingertip rule applies to holes in jeans. The dress code was also changed to allow exposed shoulders if the shirt has some kind of sleeve. The JHS Student Council, working with the JHS Administration Team, then clarified that students cannot wear completely off the shoulder tops.

“The new dress code is definitely a positive step forward for the student body but could still be revised to include more, still appropriate, changes.”

Alexa Roach, Senior

“You don’t come to an institution to be fashionable. You come to learn skills to better you in the working field.”

Sean Hyatt, Junior

“I think it’s okay, but it’s never been a problem for me because I don’t understand the thing about kneecaps or shoulders.”

Kaitlyn Hill, Freshman 

“I like the change to the dress code and I really like that the students got a say in it. But I feel like this dress code is harder to enforce, because a lot of outfits are borderline.”

Mr. Esarey, Social Studies

Story by: Leia DeGeorge

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