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Basketball Sports

Athlete Spotlight: Bailey Falkenstein

 

story by Tristan Jackson

Kenneth Groth, Brent Falkenstein, P.K. Falkenstein, Kasey Falkenstein and Kooper Falkenstein — the Falkenstein family has been churning out Jeff High basketball greats since the 1930’s.

Brent’s son, Bailey, is next in line.  

Bailey has been playing on the Varsity team since his freshman year. Now a junior, he is the team’s top scorer (18.9 points per game) and has solidified himself as a leader.

“There’s definitely some pressure there,” Falkenstein said about being a top scoring option for Jeff. “But I have to do it for my team.”

With guard/forward Michael Minton being Jeff’s lone starting senior this season, Falkenstein has stepped up and made strides in his own game. He has become a role model for underclassmen, who have also played a large role in the team’s success this year.

“It motivates you to want to elevate your game and get to the level he is at,” said sophomore Drew Taylor on playing with Falkenstein.

Since Falkenstein’s freshman year, the team has seen constant improvement. After a 2014-15 season that saw Jeff only managed an 8-14 record, new head coach Joe Luce was brought in to return JHS to its winning ways. Last season, the team posted a 19-13 record in Luce’s debut.

“Bailey has gotten to the point where not only is he a fantastic scorer and a go to guy for us,” Luce said. “He has learned to make others better around him, and I think that’s why we’ve been able to play better basketball.”

Along with the excellent skillset Falkenstein brings to the floor on a nightly basis, a winning mentality is something he prides himself on.

“I just want to be remembered as a great player who won. That’s really what I want to bring to Jeff — winning,” Falkenstein said.

In the hotbed of basketball talent in southern Indiana, Falkenstein says he is motivated by hearing what other players are doing on the court, and believing that he is just as good, if not better, than every opponent he faces.

A lack of confidence has never been an issue for Falkenstein, as he feels his work ethic has put him in position to not only be a leader on the basketball team, but to also headline a star-studded baseball team at Jeff.

“Bailey is always showing leadership by getting people focused, giving constructive criticism, and letting others know when he made a mistake,” said pitcher, and teammate, Gabe Bierman.

Falkenstein looks for both teams to have great seasons this year and next, and said his goal for the upcoming baseball season is to win a state championship.

Additionally, Falkenstein credits all athletes for finding the time to balance school and a sport. Although it’s difficult to put the work into two different sports, he says sports helped make him a better person and “the man (he is) today”.

As talented as he is on the court, it’s hard to imagine Falkenstein choosing another sport over basketball in the future, but it’s very possible.

Falkenstein is one of the team’s top baseball players, and he believes that he is talented enough to wind up playing professionally at some level.

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News

On to the Nexgen…

Story by Carley Calabro

 

Leadership Southern Indiana was initially started 36 years ago with a leadership program for business leaders called Discover.

However, in 2015, LSI has created a program specifically for high school juniors titled Nexgen.

Nexgen is a five-day leadership program for high school juniors representing every high school in both Clark and Floyd County, as well as a school in Kentucky.

Nexgen LSI is a year-long program that starts with five days of students attending different businesses and companies. Each class is dedicated to one aspect of becoming a leader, as well as learning about the community.

“Nexgen was created in 2015 because LSI thought we would get our young leaders to learn more about our community while in high school,” said program coordinator Lisa Bottorff. “We were hopeful our youth would learn more about our community so they would realize how wonderful it is a so that they would want to live, work and play here after high school and/or college.”

While there, students learn about team building, diversity and financial literacy.  They tour various businesses and companies and learn about the economy and government. Along with the tours students will be given time to meet with business, community and government leaders.

In addition, students learn about the importance of philanthropy and choose a non-profit organization to give their time, talent and treasure to. To start the program off this year, First Savings Bank donated money to the charities students learned about.

For junior Ethan English, Nexgen has already taught him how to act in the real world.

“It has taught me to be a big time leader and philanthropist in the community,” English said. “I like the fact that we get to meet an abundance of unaccustomed young adults at contradistinctive schools around the area to come together and deposit time and money into southern Indiana.”

The Nexgen organization teaches students necessary aspects in order to become a successful leader. It not only helps young leaders today, but benefits more in the long run by giving life-long lessons for the future.

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News

Top five most influential African Americans from Louisville

Story by Makiyah Owens & Braxton Troutman

Muhammad Ali (1942-2016)

Born Cassius Marcellus Clay Jr., Muhammad Ali was a professional boxer and civil rights activist. Born and raised in Louisville, Ky., Ali is known as one of the most influential and favored sports figure of the 20th century, and easily the most significant person from the Louisville Metropolitan area.

After attending Central High School, he went on to beat more champions and top contenders than any heavyweight boxing champion in history. Ali won medals, awards, and executed many selfless acts that made him such a significant person not only to the city of Louisville, but to the African American community nationwide.  

Bryson Tiller 

Bryson Tiller is an American singer, songwriter and rapper. Born and raised in Louisville, Ky., Tiller attended Iroquois High school before his career started in 2011. His big break came in 2014 when he gained recognition for his single “Don’t” from his album Trap Soul. The album was released in 2015, and climbed as high as No. 8 on the US Billboard 200.

The single “Don’t” reached No. 13 on the US Billboard Top 100, the highest a Louisville-based hip-hop artist has ever reached. In March of 2016, Tiller received the key to the city from Greg Fisher, and in the same year he received his first awards: Best New Artist and Best Male R&B/Pop Artist at the BET Awards.

Darrell Griffith 

Darrell Griffith was born and raised in Louisville, Ky., and is a graduate of Male High School. Griffith attended the University of Louisville, where he played basketball all four years at the university. While at Louisville, Griffith led the Cardinals to their first NCAA National Championship against the University of California Los Angeles in 1980.

Griffith went on to the NBA, where he was picked second overall in the 1980 NBA Draft by the Utah Jazz. Griffith played 10 season, all with the Jazz, averaging 16 points and three assists per game in his career. In 1997, Griffith started the Darrell Griffith Foundation to help give back to the community of Louisville. More recently in 2014, the Darrell Griffith Athletic Center was opened at the West End School as a gift to the community

Sadiqa Reynolds

Originally from The Bronx, Sadiqa Reynolds has found a home, and a remarkable career, in Louisville. Reynolds is the President and CEO of the Louisville Urban League, and former judge of the 30th Judicial Court. Reynolds is also the first African American woman to clerk in the Kentucky Supreme Court.

Reynolds has brought a positive and energetic attitude since taking over as President of the Louisville Urban League back in October. Reynolds has been recognized for her actions and been called a ¨Woman of Influence¨ by the city of Louisville, and a civil rights advocacy. Reynolds has also been a part of over six different boards and worked as a public servant and role model for most of her life. Reynolds is married to Keith Reynolds and has two daughters, Wynter and Sydney.

Dawne Gee

Dawne Gee was born in Louisville, and attended Pleasure Ridge Park High School. Gee attended the University of Louisville, where she maintained a Bachelor Arts degree in communications and biology. Gee has been a member of the Wave-3 news team since 1994. Before working at Wave, Gee worked in radio broadcasting at Cox Radio as an on-air personality for 17 years.

In 2009, Gee was diagnosed with kidney cancer, and on Nov. 25, suffered a stroke during a live broadcast. Miraculously, Gee recovered from both medical conditions and still continues to fulfill her role as a news anchor on Wave-3 News. Gee serves as an inspiration to the city of Louisville for her commitment to the media, and overcoming her medical issues .

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News

Athlete Spotlight: Bailey Falkenstein

Story by Tristan Jackson

Kenneth Groth, Brent Falkenstein, P.K. Falkenstein, Kasey Falkenstein and Kooper Falkenstein — the Falkenstein family has been churning out Jeff High basketball greats since the 1930’s.

Brent’s son, Bailey, is next in line.  

Bailey has been playing on the Varsity team since his freshman year. Now a junior, he is the team’s top scorer (18.9 points per game) and has solidified himself as a leader.

“There’s definitely some pressure there,” Falkenstein said about being a top scoring option for Jeff. “But I have to do it for my team.”

With guard/forward Michael Minton being Jeff’s lone starting senior this season, Falkenstein has stepped up and made strides in his own game. He has become a role model for underclassmen, who have also played a large role in the team’s success this year.

“It motivates you to want to elevate your game and get to the level he is at,” said sophomore Drew Taylor on playing with Falkenstein.

Since Falkenstein’s freshman year, the team has seen constant improvement. After a 2014-15 season that saw Jeff only managed an 8-14 record, new head coach Joe Luce was brought in to return JHS to its winning ways. Last season, the team posted a 19-13 record in Luce’s debut.

“Bailey has gotten to the point where not only is he a fantastic scorer and a go to guy for us,” Luce said. “He has learned to make others better around him, and I think that’s why we’ve been able to play better basketball.”

Along with the excellent skillset Falkenstein brings to the floor on a nightly basis, a winning mentality is something he prides himself on.

“I just want to be remembered as a great player who won. That’s really what I want to bring to Jeff — winning,” Falkenstein said.

In the hotbed of basketball talent in southern Indiana, Falkenstein says he is motivated by hearing what other players are doing on the court, and believing that he is just as good, if not better, than every opponent he faces.

A lack of confidence has never been an issue for Falkenstein, as he feels his work ethic has put him in position to not only be a leader on the basketball team, but to also headline a star-studded baseball team at Jeff.

“Bailey is always showing leadership by getting people focused, giving constructive criticism, and letting others know when he made a mistake,” said pitcher, and teammate, Gabe Bierman.

Falkenstein looks for both teams to have great seasons this year and next, and said his goal for the upcoming baseball season is to win a state championship.

Additionally, Falkenstein credits all athletes for finding the time to balance school and a sport. Although it’s difficult to put the work into two different sports, he says sports helped make him a better person and “the man (he is) today”.

As talented as he is on the court, it’s hard to imagine Falkenstein choosing another sport over basketball in the future, but it’s very possible.

Falkenstein is one of the team’s top baseball players, and he believes that he is talented enough to wind up playing professionally at some level.

While leaning towards baseball, where he has already received Division I offers from schools such as Indiana and Xavier, Falkenstein said this basketball season has opened up the possibility of playing basketball in college.

Whatever way he chooses, it’s likely his talents will carry with him to college, along with his work ethic and sense of leadership.

For the time being, Jeff fans will cheer on yet another Falkenstein from the stands as he carries on a legacy that has been over 80 years in the making. 

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News

Pride Cafe

 

When walking the JHS halls in the morning, there’s a sense of grogginess among the students, and even some teachers. There has been desire to resolve the problem with a cafe shop at Jeff for quite some time now.

On Nov. 18, that dream became a reality.

Jeff’s new cafe, which is located on the right-hand side of the Pride Store, is known as the Pride Cafe. The cafe will be selling cups of coffee, and hot chocolate with marshmallows, for $1 per cup on Fridays from 7:10 – 7:45 a.m.

Inside the store, there are three coffee makers, and four flavors to choose from: hazelnut, caramel, pumpkin spice, french vanilla. The Pride Cafe is also having a holiday special in December, so students will have the chance to get peppermint flavored coffee as a choice to choose from.

Social studies teacher Steve Cooley, who was a major help in making the cafe a possibility, was in charge of getting the Pride Cafe ready the day before the grand opening. Cooley was excited about the opening, and equally excited for the students to enjoy the cafe for themselves.

“Hopefully we will have a line of kids out there waiting to get in,” Cooley said.

Inside the Cafe

The cafe is a PBIS (Protective Behavioral Intervention and Supports) rewards fundraiser. So when students buy a cup of coffee, the money earned will go towards rewards and prizes that JHS will then give back out to students who win them. Some of these prizes include gift cards, trips during school days, and more.

“What we’re trying to do is find a way to generate a revenue stream to pay back the kids,” Cooley said.

So how did the idea of the Pride Cafe become a reality? According to Cooley, a student-teacher at another school had a Keurig in the classroom, and would reward her students with coffee for good behavior.

That, along with cooling weather, is what prompted JHS staff to implement a cafe at the school.

The expectations for the cafe is that students at Jeff High will enjoy a nice cup of coffee or hot chocolate in the morning to feel more awake, while also being responsible with it and throwing their trash away once they’re done.

“We want to encourage our kids (students) to be smart with the coffee,” Cooley said.

There has been talk among staff of a lounge being the next step for the cafe so students can go in, relax and watch some television while enjoying a nice cup of coffee. The Pride Cafe could be the start of a Pride Lounge, potentially becoming the next addition to the many improvements added to JHS recently.

As Cooley wished, the opening of the cafe was a hit, with roughly 60 students waiting in line to get their cup of coffee and hot chocolate.

Unfortunately the cafe was forced to close before everyone could get a cup due to the overwhelming response. If the Pride Cafe continues with the success it has shown, it could become a well-known tradition at Jeff High.

Categories
Basketball Sports

Remembering Legends

Story by Pat Duerr

Mike Flynn and Tony Winburn, two Jeffersonville High School basketball legends, have become enshrined in the city that built them.

Two basketball courts at Richard L. Vissing Park, located in the Oak Park neighborhood, have been named after the pair. While the star basketball players showcased their talent while at JHS, their careers after high school are what made them so loved.

Flynn became Jeffersonville’s first Indiana Mr. Basketball before attending the University of Kentucky to play basketball for three seasons. After Flynn graduated from college, the 6-3 guard went on to play four years in the NBA for the Indiana Pacers, before finishing his career in Sweden.

Winburn played at Indiana University Southeast before transferring to the University of Evansville. Winburn and 28 others, though, were tragically killed in a plane crash in 1977, cutting short his life.

The courts, which are painted black in the middle of the park, have the respective players’ names painted at half-court circling a crisp, red basketball.

The courts provide not only eye candy in the park, but a new place for young players to hone their skills — exactly how the names they are playing on did in the past.