Categories
Feature Tennis

Mark Reilly Looks Back on Nearly Four Decades at Jeff High

reilly-by-max-fisherWhen Mark Reilly applied to teach science at Jeffersonville High School in 1983, he was surprised to get the job because “teaching jobs were hard to come by.” Little did he know the impact and length of his stay at Jeff High. Reilly has been teaching science at Jeff High for 38 years. He says he had always had an interest in teaching and he noticed that he was often used to help others both in class and in sports when he was a kid. This discovered talent would become his passion through his teaching and coaching. Reilly is well known for his class and always optimistic personality. Around school, his classes are favorites among Jeff High Students. Whether it’s the baby chicks he gives his biology students or the field trips his environmental science classes take, Reilly is well known as a fun teacher who wants the best for his students.

Many others know Reilly as a coach. He first started coaching in 1984, when he was an assistant baseball coach for two years. After that, he began coaching tennis, a job that lasted him 30 years, and ended with him as one of the most successful coaches in Jeffersonville High School History, and put his tennis program in a position to compete for a state title.

Reilly started his first girls’ season with a team where half of the players couldn’t keep score. His final boys’ team pushed eventual state champions North Central in a close 2-3 loss in the state semi-final.

In his teaching and coaching, Reilly says the biggest difference between the two is in the connection. “With sports, there’s more of a connection, kids respect me on the tennis court because of my play and knowledge, and they want to get better at tennis,” he says. However, in the classroom, he says he “has to make connections because we don’t have something in common. They need to know you care.”

Looking back at his career, Reilly hopes his students and players remember that he cared and always wanted the best for them. He says he still sees people that remember what he did for them when he was coaching or teaching. One thing he has learned over his years is the amount of influence he can have on someone’s life. “The impact you have on individuals, daily, you won’t realize until possibly ten years later,” says Reilly, “So, treat every kid with the same enthusiasm.”

Categories
Opinion

Opposing Views: Should We Build the Border Wall?

JHS students and staff weigh in on the pros and cons of President Trump’s plan for securing the border with Mexico

“I am against the wall. Statistics show we don’t need the wall and if we get a wall it won’t do the things Trump says it will.”
– Jojo Spio, Senior

“I am for the wall because we do need to protect our borders. Every other country in the world protects their borders so I don’t see why we can’t. Should we let immigrants in and out? Yes, but it has to be according to proper procedures.”
– Mr. Dench, Radio and TV Teacher

“I am against it because I feel like the money that could go to the wall could go towards many other things that could be way more beneficial for the country. For example, Flint Michigan still doesn’t have clean water. Why would we spend so much money on a wall, when we could spend money on getting citizens clean water?”
– Jaleigh Brown, Sophomore

“I’m for the wall. It seems like a pretty obvious solution to me. If you want to stop people from coming in, you put a barrier in front of them.”
– Brennan Zastawny, Senior

“America was founded on the idea that it was for immigrants. It was founded by immigrants, for immigrants, and for people who needed a safe place. And if you really want to get technical, the first illegal immigrants showed up in 1492 with Christopher Columbus. The wall won’t stop illegal immigration.”
– Mr. Henderson, English Teacher

“In my opinion the wall isn’t a bad solution to immigration, but it’s not perfect either. But bottom line is eventually something needs to be done and the wall seems like a fitting solution to the problem.”
– Lex Hawkins, Junior

Written by Joselen Lopez, Mattie Blanton, and Sophie Rousseau

Categories
News

Welcome the New Teachers at Jeff High

Exchange students, transfer students and freshmen aren’t the only new faces at Jeff High this year. We also welcomed several new teachers.

The Hyphen asked some of the new staff members for their thoughts on teaching. Here’s what they said:

w-stevens
Ms. Stevens, Special Education
“No matter what accomplishments you achieve, somebody helped you.”

r-russell

Mr. Russell, Special Education
“The important thing is not so much that every child should be taught. It’s that every student should be allowed to learn.”

s-stock

Mr. Stock, Social Studies
“The greatest use of a life is to spend it for something that will outlast it.”

c-manley

Mr. Manley, ROTC
“When all else fails, march with your head high.”

m-esarey

Ms. Esarey, Science
“When I was in the second grade I realized education can change your entire life. Now I’m honored to change someone else.”

glesing-by-antonio-thompson

Mr. Glesing, Social Studies and PE
“Teaching kids to count is fine, but teaching them what counts is the best.”

Written by Keandre Campbell

Glesing Photo by Antonio Thompson

All Other Photos by LifeTouch

Categories
News

MULTIMEDIA: Questions Surround the Future of Teaching in America

video by Lisa Morris & Aa Leiah Winford

All across the country, students are voicing their opinions on gun safety, school violence and how to stay safe during a school day.

However students aren’t the only ones in a typical high school to voice their concerns this year — teachers are doing it, as well.

Teachers from states like West Virginia, Arizona and even Kentucky are speaking out about their decimating benefits, and overall lack of respect from some politicians.

The Hyphen‘s Lisa Morris and Aa Leiah Winford spoke with two JHS teachers — Suzanne Seibert and Allison Stemle — on how they’re handling the outspokenness of their profession.