Coaching with Confidence

Isaac Parker Headshot

Isaac Parker takes over as the new JHS Football Head Coach

The Jeffersonville High School football team recently introduced Isaac Parker as the new head coach. Parker was the assistant coach for the team for four years before becoming the head coach.

Parker attended Jeffersonville High School and played for the football team for all four years. He went on to play for the University of Louisville for one year before becoming a police officer for the Jeffersonville Police Department.

For Parker it was an emotional experience becoming the coach. “It was emotional at first, I contacted my wife and then my parents, let them know,” Parker told WAVE 3 News, “I went from just that pure excitement, to a little bit of anxiety and I’ve pretty much lived with that over the last month,” he continued.

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Nolan Schultz, a sophomore on the team, says that the team is extremely happy about their new head coach and that they believe this year’s season will be much better than last year. “He’s a great coach,’’ said Schultz.

After losses against Fern Creek and Seymour to start the year, the team secured their first win of the season in a 32-13 victory over New Albany in the Sept. 6 Homecoming game.

Written by Kaitlyn Monroe

Parker Photo: Submitted, Practice Photo: Kyle Rider

From Floyd to Jeff: Brian Glesing’s Road to the Red Devils

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Brian Glesing was hired as the head coach of Jeffersonville on May 1. Before JHS, Glesing was the head coach of rival Floyd Central for 11 seasons, posting a 70-51 overall record.

story by Tristan Jackson
submitted photo / Brian Glesing

Jeffersonville versus Floyd Central is one of the most heated sports rivalries in Southern Indiana.

Next year, however, fans may see a whole new level of intensity on the football field.

Brian Glesing, who has been the head coach at Floyd Central for the past 11 seasons, was hired on May 1 to fill the head coach vacancy for the Red Devils. He replaced Alfonzo Browning, who posted a 8-13 record in his two seasons as head coach.

“When it came down to it, with his understanding of the community and his understanding of Indiana football, (Glesing) was the logical choice,” Jeffersonville athletic director Todd Satterly said.

Despite his recent success at the helm of FC, though, Glesing is leaving the Highlanders to take a job he has hoped to get since he first came to Southern Indiana.

“I think this is just a great opportunity,” Glesing said. “I think there is so much potential and everyone I’ve talked to has told me this is a great place to be, and I believe ‘em.

“It’s gonna be tough to leave (Floyd Central),” Glesing continued. “But it was time for a change and I’m excited about being here (at Jeff).”

THE PATH TO JEFF

While Glesing has made a name for himself in Southern Indiana as a coach during the last decade, he was also a successful athlete in his own right growing up. From 1989 to 1993, Glesing lit up the football and baseball fields at Hanover College.

During his four-year career, Glesing racked up 5,914 total all-purpose yards and 282 total points, which are both still all-time records at the college. It could be argued that his baseball career was even more impressive, as he holds the school record in career hits (266), runs scored (213) and stolen bases (150).

Glesing’s first head coaching position came in 2001 at LaVille High School in Lakeville, Ind. He would eventually make his way to Clarksville High School five years later, his first head coaching gig in Southern Indiana.

After two seasons coaching the Generals, Glesing took over a Floyd Central team that was reeling. He inherited a team that had a combined record of 3-17 in the previous two years, including a culture that wasn’t used to winning close games.

“I think this is just a great opportunity. I think there is so much potential and everyone I’ve talked to has told me this is a great place to be, and I believe ‘em. It’s gonna be tough to leave (Floyd Central). But it was time for a change and I’m excited about being here (at Jeff).”

– Brian Glesing, JHS football head coach

However Glesing turned the program around during his 11 seasons, propelling them to a 70-51 record, and a Sectional title in 2009 at Floyd Central.

In 2017, a Glesing-led Floyd Central managed a 9-3 record. He guided them to a 6-1 record in the Hoosier Hills Conference, including a perfect 5-0 record at home, before losing to powerhouse Columbus East in the Sectional championship.

BATTLES BEYOND THE FIELD

While his success as a coach is undeniable, boasting a 111-81 record in 18 seasons, last season was a memorable one for an entirely different reason: Gelsing had another battle, this one being off the field.

In March 2017, Glesing was diagnosed Hodgkin’s Lymphoma for the second time. Hodgkin’s Lymphoma is a relatively rare form of cancer that affects the immune system. Glesing’s second bout with the disease came 23 years after his first in 1994, just after he graduated from Hanover College.

Regardless, Glesing managed to coach the whole season while doing chemotherapy, and he concluded his treatment in October of 2017.  

“No,” said Todd Satterly when asked if Glesing’s battle with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma played a part in the decision to hire him. “During the interview, he volunteered all that information. So as long as he feels up to the task of what it takes to run a 6A program, (his health) had nothing to do with the decision.”

GLESING ON THE MOVE

Now, Glesing has a clean bill of health, and a fresh start, at Jeffersonville. He understands that there is work to do, but he has proven that he has the tools to turn a team around, something Jeff High is looking for.

“We need to be the best team in Southern Indiana right now, and eventually take that to the state level,” Glesing said. “But right now, we need to beat New Albany and Floyd Central. Once we do that, we can set our focuses higher.”

Parallels can be drawn between Jeff High’s current roster, and Floyd Central before the arrival of Glesing. Jeffersonville’s record has underwhelmed recently, managing just eight wins in 21 games the past two season.

“We [have to] establish what a Jeff High football player is,” Glesing said. “We want to instill the attitude, character, and effort in our players on and off the field. If you do those three things you’re going to be successful in whatever you do.”

Glesing will look to do at Jeff, what he did with Floyd Central: turn a team used to losing into a contender. He has a busy summer planned for the team, including turning his players into “bad dudes” with a coaching style he describes as “firm, but fair.”

“He’s all about family,” Varisty punter Alex Macaluso said. “He wants to get to know us and our family and he cares a lot. That’s what our football program needs.”

If all goes as planned, the future of the Red Devil football team is bright under the team’s new coach Brian Glesing.

“I’m convinced we’re going to do some great things,” Glesing said.

‘The Devil’s Parlour’

story by Tomi Clark

Enthusiastic chants and shouts echo from the stands where Jeff High pride shines through, blindingly bright. The stadium lights add a spotlight on the field, which highlights the players running the field.

Jeff High’s new student section, The Devil’s Parlour, holler and laugh with one another when a touchdown, or an infallible pass, is made.

After teaming up with Parlour, one of downtown Jeffersonville’s newest restaurants, the student section is looking to make Friday night lights a bit more fun for everybody. Parlour is a new pizzeria located in downtown Jeff, near the base of the Big Four Walking Bridge.

In order for the student section to bear the pizzeria’s name, The Devil’s Parlour, the exchange was that in return, Parlour will provide discounts on pizza every once in awhile for the students.

“We’re partnering with them, and trying to get multiple years of going with them, to get the student section better,” said senior Trey Bottorff. He, along with seniors Gerrin Moore and Jay Williams, were responsible for organizing and getting this endeavor off of its feet.

For two weeks, student section shirts were sold for $15, but are now unavailable for purchase.

The purpose of the shirts is so students can rep them at games and around school; if they can’t follow the weekly football theme, the shirt is the perfect alternative.

“It’s something to center around,” Moore said of the sponsorship. “Once people get there, then they realize what a great thing it is, so it’s just bringing more attention to it so that more people can get out there and eventually realize how great of a thing we have here at Jeff.”

Their main goal is to convince more students to attend football games. Moore hopes if they give students a satisfactory outlet to come to, then more will frequent the student section.

“I want to give students a reason to come to the game and enjoy themselves, and I feel that partnering with someone like that will allow us to get more things for our students in order to bring them to the games,” Moore said. “And once you start getting kids to the games, then they can enjoy themselves, have fun and want to keep coming back.”

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The Devil’s Parlour, with the cheerleaders, at the Jeff vs Floyd game.

Commentary: College Football Playoff Expansion

By Adrian Blair

The College Football Playoff debuted shortly following the 2014 regular season, and has only grown since. From Larry Culpepper, the Dr. Pepper guy, to the weekly release of the new College Football Playoff rankings, college football owns November and December.

However, there is one area where improvement is needed. We, as college football fans, want an expanded playoff bracket, preferably to eight teams.

With eight teams, it is likely that no Power Five conference champion is left out, like in years past (sorry 2014 Baylor and TCU). Eight teams also gives an opportunity for two teams in the same conference to be in the playoff, via Michigan and Ohio State from the Big Ten.

Sports and money go hand in hand, and it honestly confuses me why they haven’t expanded already. Behind its “big brother” in the National Football league, college football is the No. 2 viewed sport in the American television market. TV equals money, so why not? Giving the fans what they want and making even more money doing it sounds pretty great to me.

Another area worth looking at is the media exposure. Last season, the final College Football Playoff rankings were released on Dec. 6, 2015, with the National Championship on Jan. 11, 2016.

During that 37-day span, media outlets across the country absolutely devour the College Football Playoff. Media coverage equals money. If it wasn’t already brought to your attention, money is the main root of why the College Football Playoff is even in existence.

Having great players in great games is really what fans watch for. Players such as Clemson’s Deshaun Watson, Ohio State’s J.T. Barrett, and  Michigan’s Jabrill Peppers all have their respective teams in the Playoff mix. The two most recent Heisman trophy winners have participated in the College Football Playoff, and have failed to disappoint.

With more teams, there is more dynamic and electric players on the field, making for a more exciting viewing experience.

While the newly created College Football Playoff doesn’t show any signs of expanding following this year, it is a strong possibility in the years to come.


Jeffersonville’s Jermaine Ross lived the NFL dream

story by Carlos Molina

This past NFL offseason, history was made as it was the first time a major sports club was relocated back to the city that they originally moved from. The St. Louis Rams franchise was relocated to their new (technically returning) city of Los Angeles.

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Jermaine Ross walks back to the huddle in his rookie year with the Los Angeles Rams. Ross was the last L.A. Rams receiver to catch a touchdown pass until Week 3 of the 2016 NFL season, when the St. Louis Rams moved back to Los Angeles.

On Sept. 25, in the team’s third regular season game, Rams wideout Brian Quick scored the team’s first passing touchdown since moving back to California. Quarterback Case Keenum hit Quick on a deep post route for a 44-yard touchdown pass against Tampa Bay. It was the first passing touchdown in Los Angeles since December 24,1994.

So why should Jeffersonville, Ind. residents be concerned with this?

Well the last touchdown the Rams scored before moving to St. Louis was a 36-yard pass to Jermaine Ross, a Jeffersonville High School alumni.

A member of the Jeff 1989 graduation class, Ross played football, basketball and ran track in his time at JHS. He ultimately received a scholarship to run track at Purdue University and walked-on to Purdue’s football team.

“My time in college really showed me how to be independent,” Ross said. “At first, I received a scholarship to run track at Purdue, but football was my real passion. So, I decided to walk-on.”

During his college career, Ross had a total of 74 receptions for 1322 yards, seven touchdowns, and averaged 17.9 yards per reception. His time on the field caught the attention of several professional teams, and he would later enter his name into the 1994 NFL Draft.

“I had the New Orleans Saints reach out to me during the draft. They told me that they were going to pick me in a later round,” Ross explained. “After the draft, I was officially an undrafted free agent, meaning that any team could pick me up. The Saints reached out to me again, so did the Cincinnati Bengals, L.A. Rams and the Washington Redskins. It came down to the Rams and Bengals, but ultimately I spent my rookie year in L.A. They gave a bigger signing bonus.”

Fellow rookie Keith Lyle joined the Rams the same time Ross did. Drafted in the third round (71st overall pick) out of the University of Virginia, Lyle was one of Ross’ good friends that he met in his time in the NFL. Lyle played three years with Ross in the NFL.

“Jermaine always played aggressively. It was his mindset,” Lyle said. “He took advantage of every opportunity he had and his work ethic were his biggest strength.”

Ross’ rookie year would also be the last for the Rams in Los Angeles, as the team’s owners wished to relocate to St. Louis, Mo.

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Trading card from Ross’ rookie year

Ross had been held catchless all season heading into the last game of the 1994 season, where the Rams faced off against the Washington Redskins. The Redskins would go on to top the Rams, who finished 4-12 on the season, by a score of 24-21.

However in the game’s waning minutes, Ross got open and his was hit by quarterback Chris Miller on a 36-yard post route. The catch would be the first, and last, reception for Ross that season.

It would also be the final touchdown scored by the Rams in Los Angeles before the franchise moved to St. Louis.

“I didn’t really expect (the touchdown) to mean much,” Ross said. “It was my only touchdown and my only reception of that season.”

In Ross’ second year, he suffered an ACL tear, which would end his season prematurely. He would spend two more season with the Rams before being released. Ross would then sign with the Jacksonville Jaguars before breaking his left arm. He tried a comeback with the Cleveland Browns before he was ultimately cut. Ross retired in 2000 and moved back to Indianapolis, where he became an engineer at Allison Transmission.

Despite bouncing around different cities during his football days, Ross was always loyal to the city of Jeff. In fact Lyle, his former teammate, had never heard of the small town until Ross told him where he was from.

“Your environment has everything to do with your personality, and I think that stands out with Jermaine. Outside of football, he’s a smart guy — he became an engineer,” Lyle said.

Ross’ nephew, Brendan Lawler, grew up in that same city. Lawler is currently Charlestown High School’s quarterback, and knows what kind of bar his uncle set for him.

“He has been a major influence on me,” Lawler said. “What he achieved is nearly impossible and it kind of set the bar for me, especially me being a football player from this area. It gives me hope that maybe I can do the same thing he did someday.”

A determination to make it to the NFL is what drove Ross to be the very best he can be, even after starting his collegiate career as a walk-on.

“The thought of never making it to a higher level was never on my mind,” Ross said. “I knew it was my destiny to play professional ball. One time, a veteran player said that none of us (rookie receivers), including myself, would make the team. I was the only one to make it.”

The significance of a local athlete making it to the largest stage in professional football has given a deeper meaning to current athletes vying for the same in the southern Indiana area.

“I think it means a lot, not only to the city of Jeff, but southern Indiana as a whole. It’s very rare to see an athlete in this area to make it to make it to that level,” Lawler said.

To come from a city that few people are familiar with, Ross has set his mark.

“Jeff was good to me,” Ross said. “I’m very proud to be from there. Whenever someone ask me where I’m from, I always say Jeffersonville, Indiana. Never Louisville. I’m glad to have that Red Pride.”

All Photos submitted 

Overton Overachieving

Story by Carlos Molina

Jeffersonville senior offensive tackle/defensive end Dayna Overton has been catching the attention of some of the country’s most prestigious football programs.

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Dayna Overton using a punching bag during training day for the University of Louisville

Overton has been part of the Jeff High football team all four years, and has spent one year as a member of the Jeff track and field team.

The returning Red Devil made a huge impression on his coaches and teammates his junior year. Last season, Overton became an offensive Varsity starter among an offensive line full of seniors. He quickly earned the respect of his fellow teammates, and his opponents on the other side of the ball.

His time on the track also benefited him in football.

“I believe track helped me as a competitor,” Overton said. “It really helped me get rid of the nervousness when under pressure to perform at a high level. Now after track season, I don’t get nervous in the spotlight like I used to.”

A big reason for his success was his self motivation, and the support from his family, friends, and teammates. Overton’s mother, Amanda Kinnaird, played volleyball in her time at Jeff. The former Red Devil knows what sports mean to the community, and only wants to help him gain a competitive edge on his opponents.

“We’ve seen the success he’s been having and we’re behind him 100-percent,” Kinnaird said. “He’s always been a talented athlete — people are just now starting to notice.”

Overton’s parents have been there every step of the way, cheering him on from home football games, as well as track meets that are as much as four hours away.

“I think that the motivation to push myself to be a better player was always inside of me. I just had to find it with myself,” Overton said. “But also having a great pair of parents behind me, always motivating me to get better everyday.”

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Dayna Overton working with other prospective lineman during his training

Teammates, like quarterback Cameron Northern, have noticed the leadership skills he’s developed recently. Aware with the hard work he’s been putting in, they’ve set him to high standards.

“I hope to see him get his first offer and just become the player I know he can be,” Northern said. “I just want to see him dominate, see him being All-Conference, and maybe an All-State performance. He used to be an okay football player, but now he’s one of our best lineman and hardest workers.”

Jeffersonville head coach Alfonzo Browning has seen the way Overton has been growing the past two years. Browning’s star tackle has been an unsung hero on his high-powered offense.

“Dayna’s grown up a lot in the last two years,” Browning said. “His biggest improvement has been mental. He’s realized that he has a ton of untapped potential that he is now getting a grasp of. He’s helping lead a unit that will probably be the strength of our team.”

On July 15, Overton’s hard work paid off, as the tackle was invited to a seniors-only camp at the University of Louisville called Light up the Ville, which was hosted by Louisville head coach Bobby Petrino and his staff.

The camp marked the third time in the past year Overton has been invited to their training facility. Over the past summer, Overton has attended camps at Purdue, Ball State, Louisville and Western Kentucky.

“Being with the coaches again was so great. I loved going up against some of the top recruits in the country,” Overton said. “Going up against good competition just makes you a better athlete.”

Overton’s play stood out to offensive line/run game coordinator coach Chris Klenakis  so much that after the camp, Klenakis told Overton he had “made his guys look like fools” when referring to the 1-on-1 drills with the offensive linemen.

“He really stood out and performed well in several drills, and almost every guy in the D-line and O-line were at least three-star recruits,” Kinnaird said. “That camp was absolutely stacked with talent and he shined among them.”

With all the camps and recruiting news, Overton still gets support from school mates and friends. His teammates continue to push him to achieve his goal of getting offered a scholarship.

“Amongst the whole news about recruiting me, I’ve really noticed how much love and support I have from friends, family, and teammates,” Overton said. “I’m truly loving it.”

All Photos submitted

Jeff Football looking to improve, again

 

“We have a history of not doing great in the first few games of the season, and we really want to change that trend,” Browning said.

While Browning is excited for the season, he expects to see large improvements from last season.


Junior Cameron McClure, Jeff’s starting center, agrees, and thinks the offseason workouts will benefit the Red Devils.

“We have worked really hard all summer for this season,” McClure said. “Our guys are really excited to do some thumping.”

While last season was filled with ups and downs, starting nose guard Brandon “Beef”

Wellington image1believes that a fast start to a season is key to winning.

“The first few games of any season are always a big test. It can show if you’ve made any improvements during the offseason or if there’s still anything you need to practice on more,” Wellington said. “As a player on the team, I can say that we are putting in hard work and dedication into the season and we have a lot of amazing talent on the team. I have faith in this team that we can do incredible things this season as a team.”

In the first game of the season, the Red Devils faced off against Southwestern in the Don Marshall Bowl. The Red Devils fell to the Warriors, 56-26. Senior running back Jordan Barnett ran for 159 yards and three touchdowns.

Junior Kameron Fuller also ran for 139 yards and a touchdown. Senior Cameron Northern threw for a total of 91 yards on  10-21 passing.

Photo by Carlos Molina